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Archaeology International

 Archaeology International ISSN: 2048-4194

  Contact the journal

   All general enquiries should be sent to the 
   Editor-in-Chief Dr Alice Stevenson 
   alice.stevenson@ucl.ac.uk

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest centre for research and teaching in the fields of archaeology, cultural heritage, conservation and museum studies in Britain. It hosts events on many different aspects of archaeology and it is linked to a wide range of heritage organisations, museums and archaeological societies internationally, providing an outstanding research environment for staff, students and visitors.

Archaeology International, produced annually, combines news about Institute activities with reports on research, both on new and on-going projects, carried out by members of staff. Refereed articles reflect the broad geographical, theoretical and methodological scope of research at the Institute. Reports and news items cover topics such as recent publications by Institute staff, current fieldwork and aspects of the history of the Institute. The intended audience is both academic researchers and those with a general interest in archaeology and heritage.

This publication supersedes the Institute of Archaeology Bulletin (published until 1994, numbers 30 and 31). Archaeology International now has a fully online edition, to which back issues have been added.  

   

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is one of the largest centres for archaeology, cultural heritage and museum studies in Britain. Founded in 1937, it is one of very few places in the world actively pursuing research on a global scale in the archaeological sciences, heritage studies and world archaeology.

The Institute offers Undergraduate, Graduate Taught and Graduate Research Programmes to UK/EU and overseas students. Opportunities are also available to members of the public to take courses at the Institute and to affiliate students wishing to spend some time at the Institute during their own degree programmes.

Read more about the UCL Institute of Archaeology at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology

 

Editor-in-Chief

Dr Alice Stevenson, Associate Professor in Museum Studies, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK    

 

Deputy Editor

Barney Harris, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK

 

Editorial Board Chair

Prof Sue Hamilton, Professor of Prehistory, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK

 

Editorial Board Members

Prof Dorian Fuller, Professor of Archaeobotany, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK
Dr Andrew Garrard, Reader in Early Prehistory, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK
Prof Rodney Harrison, Professor of Heritage Studies, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK
Andrew Margetts, Post-Excavation Manager, Archaeology South-East
Katie Meheux, UCL Institute of Archaeology Library, UCL Library Services, United Kingdom
Prof Kevin MacDonald, Professor of African Archaeology, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK
Dr Theano Moussouri, Associate Professor in Museum Studies, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK
Dan Swift, Post-excavation Project Manager, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK
David Wengrow, Professor of Comparative Archaeology, Institute of Archaeology, UCL, UK


 

Open access policy

From December 2020, all articles published in the Archaeology International are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution Licence (CC-BY) 4.0 international licence agreement and published open access, making them immediately and freely available to read and download. The CC-BY licence agreement allows authors to retain copyright while allowing others to copy, distribute, and make some uses of the work.

Further information regarding this can be found at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ and licensing terms and conditions can be found in our Editorial Policy.

 

Abstracting & indexing

UCL Press works with subject specific indexers to deposit published articles in relevant repositories and search databases. Articles published in the Archaeology International are indexed in: 

  • academia.edu
  • Cengage Learning
  • Center for Open Science
  • Chronos
  • CNKI
  • Dimensions 
  • Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ),
  • EBSCOHost
  • European Reference Index for Humanities and Social Sciences (ERIH PLUS)
  • ExLibris
  • Google Scholar
  • JISC KB+
  • Journal TOCs
  • Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers
  • OpenAIRE
  • OCLC
  • Sparrho
  • UCL Discovery
  • Web of Science - Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), 


Peer review

All submissions to Archaeology International are initially assessed by an Editor, who decides whether or not the article is suitable for peer review. Submissions considered suitable for peer review are assigned to two or more independent experts, who assess the article for clarity, validity, and sound methodology.

Authors may be invited to recommend or ask for the exclusion of specific individuals from the peer review process. The journal does not guarantee to use these suggestions. All reviewers must be independent from the submission and will be asked to declare all competing interests.

Archaeology International operates a double-blind peer review process, meaning that authors and reviewers remain anonymous for the review process. The review period is expected to take around four to eight weeks, although this may vary depending on reviewer availability. Reviewers are asked to provide formative feedback, even if an article is not deemed suitable for publication in the journal.

Based on the reviewer reports the editor will make a recommendation for rejection, minor or major revisions, or acceptance. Overall editorial responsibility rests with the journal’s Editor-in-Chief, who is supported by an expert, international Editorial Board.

Archaeology International is happy to accept submissions of papers that have been loaded onto preprint servers or personal websites, have been presented at conferences, or other informal communication channels. These formats will not be deemed prior publication. Authors must retain copyright to such postings. Authors are encouraged to link any prior posting of their paper to the final published version within the journal, if it is editorially accepted.

Members of the editorial team/board are permitted to submit their own papers to the journal. In cases where an author is associated with the journal, they will be removed from all editorial tasks for that paper and another member of the team will be assigned responsibility for overseeing peer review. A competing interest must also be declared within the submission and any resulting publication.

Reviewer guidelines 

Reviewers are asked to provide comment on the below topics and guidelines:

  • Content: Does the article fit within the scope of the journal? Is the submission original, relevant and rigorous? Is the author’s depth of understanding of the issues researched adequate? Are the sources and references adequate? Has the existing knowledge base been explored and built upon? Are the chosen methodologies appropriate and have they and the evidential base been appropriately used? Does the conclusion reflect the argument in the main body text and bring something new to the debate?
  • Structure and argument: Does the abstract summarise the arguments in a succinct and accurate way? Is the manuscript logically structured and do the arguments flow coherently? Is there enough reference to methodology in the introduction and are the arguments fully evidenced and substantiated? Does the introduction signpost the arguments in the logical way and does the conclusion adequately summarise them?
  • Figures/tables: Does the author’s use of tables, charts, figures or maps illustrate the arguments and support the evidential base? Is the quality of the formatting and presentation adequate?
  • Formatting: Does the submitted file adhere to the general author guidelines listed for the journal? Are the citations and references formatted to house-style?
  • Language: Is the text well written and jargon free? Please comment on the quality of English and need for grammatical improvement.

Further information regarding peer review can be found on our Peer Review Policy.

Article publication charges (APC)

UCL Press journals do not levy an Article-Processing Charge (APC) for submission or publication in Archaeology International. Contributors to Archaeology International will not be required to make an APC payment for submission or publication of their article.

How to submit

Authors should follow the journal’s author guidelines. Manuscripts that are not formatted appropriately for the journal will be referred to edit accordingly before peer review.

All submissions should be sent to the Editor-in-Chief. Please email your full manuscript, author CV, as well as a 300 word abstract to the Editor at…

Before submitting to the journal, all authors must have read and agreed to the journal’s editorial policy and the Journals Contributor Agreement https://www.uclpress.co.uk/pages/journals-contributor-agreement.

When to submit 

Archaeology International publishes one issue per year. Submissions can be sent throughout the year, however, editorial deadlines are:

  • For research articles: March / April
  • For reports, news items and similar: May / June

  

Preparing your manuscript

Authors are requested to reference the guidelines for journal authors, as well as the following specific instructions outlined here. It is the responsibility of the author to ensure adherence to the style guide. Please note that editors will not undertake any extensive formatting to this extent, and anything not adhering to the guidelines might be returned for revision.

The Archaeology International operates double blind peer review, where both the reviewers and authors are anonymised during review. Authors should submit an anonymous version of the manuscript, stripped of all identifying references to the author(s) for peer review. The word count should be clearly indicated. All submissions must be in .doc or .docx format to facilitate the peer-review process.


Article types

Research articles 
Research articles are fully refereed. They should describe the aims, processes, outcomes and application of unpublished original research. They should make a substantial contribution to knowledge and understanding of the subject matter and should be supported by relevant figures and tabulated data. Research articles should be normally no more than 6,000 words in length (including list of references), with 4 figures.

Research updates
Research updates should introduce a new research project or present an overview of research in progress. Normally no more than 2000 words (including references), and 2 figures.

News
News articles should describe events relevant to the Institute of Archaeology which have occurred within the last year. Normally no more than 1000 words  and 1 figure.

People and places
People and places articles by alumni should be normally no more than 1000 words (including references), with 1 figure.

All word limits include citations, notes, and list of references.

NOTE: If Authors wish to include more figures the number of words in the text may need to be adjusted.

Formatting 

It makes a huge difference to the ease of production if you read and adhere to the author guidelines when preparing your manuscript. If your submission does not follow these guidelines it may be returned to you for modification.

Title page
The title page must include all of the information below, in the same order. No further information should be included:

  1. Title of the manuscript
  2. Full name(s) of contributing authors including their institutions/affiliation and address, and their institutional email address (including ORCiD ID’s).
  3. The corresponding author should be clearly identified and include their contact email address (normally this will be your UCL email address)

Abstract
Present the abstract as an overview of your article (up to 250 words), giving a summary of the contents and major themes. (Note that this will ultimately be used by search engines, and it will form part of the meta-data that will be seen first by people searching your article.)

Keywords
All articles must list a maximum of up to ten key words.

Main text
The body of the submission should be structured in a logical and easy to follow manner. A clear introduction section should provide non-specialists in the subject with an understanding of the topic and a background to the issue(s) involved. Methods, results, discussion and conclusion sections may then follow to clearly detail the information and research being presented.

Headings and sub-headings
Up to three level headings may be present and must be clearly identifiable using different font sizes, bold or italics. We suggest using Headings 1, 2 and 3 in MS-Word’s ‘Style’ section.

List of abbreviations
If any abbreviations have been used, please define and list them accordingly under this heading.

End notes
Use endnotes rather than footnotes, for any additional notes and information. These appear at the end of the main text, before References. All notes should be used only where crucial clarifying information needs to be conveyed.

Acknowledgements
The Acknowledgements page mentions everyone whose contribution to the work you wish to recognise.

Funding Information (if applicable)
Should the research have received a funding grant then the grant provider and grant number should be detailed.

References/bibliography
A full references list should contain all the sources cited in the text.

Declarations and conflict of interests
Clearly state the following in the article:

  • Consent from all authors for publication and their contributions
  • Clearly declare any possible conflicts of interest, including but not limited to financial and non-financial competing interests. Where there are no conflicts of interests or competing interests, authors must clearly declare this under the same heading. For further information, please refer to the journal’s Editorial Policy.
  • For research involving human subjects, informed consent to participate in the study must be obtained from participants (or their legal guardian).

Authors' contributions
A sentence or a short paragraph detailing the roles that each author held to contribute to the authorship of the submission. Individuals listed must fit within the definition of an author, as per the authorship guidelines.

Common errors to avoid
Archaeology International uses several stylistic idiosyncrasies that are often overlooked by authors when preparing their manuscripts. For your convenience, these are listed below. Please be aware that this list is by no means exhaustive and authors should consult the full guidelines if in doubt.

  • Any supplementary material should be submitted as separate files and referenced in the main text, or designated for review purposes only (including clarifying this in your covering letter to the Editor if relevant.)
  • The use of ‘et al’ should be avoided. Please refer to the Author Guidelines for further guidance on correct referencing.
  • Multiple sources within single in-text citations should be separated with a semi-colon and arranged alphabetically. See the References section for further information.
  • Bibliographic entries referring to online resources (web pages etc.) should always be appended with a ‘last accessed’ date in the following format: [Last accessed numeric date text month numeric year]. See the References section for further information. 
  • Bibliographic entries should always be appended with a DOI link, where it is available (this applies to nearly all journal articles and more recent chapters in edited volumes). You should obtain your DOI by searching for your source using https://www.crossref.org/. This will provide you with a secure link. See the References section for further information.

ORCiD
ORCiD helps researchers record and report their work by providing researchers with a personal unique identifier that can be kept throughout their career. UCL Press journals now implement ORCiD in publications and authors are encouraged to register with ORCiD and enter their ORCiD details on submission. To register, follow the instructions on the ORCiD web pages at https://orcid.org/, or for UCL authors please visit the UCL Open Access pages http://www.ucl.ac.uk/library/open-access/ORCID

Submission Preparation Checklist 

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. Any third-party-owned materials used have been identified with appropriate credit lines, and permission obtained from the copyright holder for both the print and the online editions of the journal.
  3. The submission file is in Open Office, Microsoft Word, RTF, or Word Perfect document file format.
  4. Where available, URLs and DOIs for the references have been provided.
  5. The text uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are cited within the text at the appropriate points. Tables should be included within the text document, whilst figure files should be uploaded as supplementary files.
  6. All figures/images have a resolution of at least 150dpi (300dpi or above preferred). Each file is no more than 20MB per file. The file must be in one of the following formats: JPG, TIFF, GIF, PNG, EPS. To retain quality, the original source file is preferred.
  7. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

 

Journal Policies 

In addition to the UCL Press Journal’s Editorial Policies found online at https://www.uclpress.co.uk/pages/journals-editorial-policy, the following additional policies are relevant to Archaeology International:

 

Reproducibility

Open Data

The journal strongly encourages authors to make all data associated with their submission openly available, according to the FAIR principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable). This should be linked to from a Data Accessibility Statement within the submitted paper, which will be made public upon publication. . If data is not being made available with the journal publication then ideally a statement from the author should be provided within the submission to explain why. Data obtained from other sources must be appropriately credited.

Structured Methods

As the traditional Materials and Methods section often includes insufficient detail for readers to wholly assess the research process, the journal encourages authors to publish detailed descriptions of their structured methods in open, online platforms such as protocols.io. By providing a step-by-step description of the methods used in the study, the chance of reproducibility and usability increases, whilst also allowing authors to build on their own works and gain additional credit and citations.

Open Code

If research includes the use of software code, statistical analysis or algorithms then we also recommend that authors upload the code into Code Ocean, where it will be hosted on an open, cloud-based computational reproducibility platform, providing researchers and developers with an easy way to share, validate and discover code published in academic journals.

 

Preprint Policy

Archaeology International allows authors to deposit draft versions of their paper into a suitable preprint server, on condition that the author agrees to the below:

  • The author retains copyright to the preprint and developed works from it, and is permitted to submit it to the journal.
  • The author declares that a preprint is available within the cover letter presented during submission. This must include a link to the location of the preprint.
  • The author acknowledges that having a preprint publicly available means that the journal cannot guarantee the anonymity of the author during the review process, even if they anonymise the submitted files.
  • Should the submission be published, the authors are expected to update the information associated with the preprint version to show that a final version has been published in the journal, including the DOI linking directly to the publication.

 

Editorial

Alice Stevenson

 

News

Director's Report

Sue Hamilton

Obituaries

Jennifer French

Studying at UCL Institute of Archaeology: Past and Present

Charlotte Frearson, Jennifer French

Bookshelf: A Selection of Recent Publications from UCL Institute of Archaeology

Jennifer French, Marion Cutting

A Global Perspective on the Past: The Institute of Archaeology Around the World

Jennifer French, Marion Cutting

News : A Selection of News from the Institute

Jennifer French

 

Viewpoint

Viewpoint: Archaeology of Strikes and Revolution

Renata Peters, David Wengrow, Stephen Quirke, Beverley Butler, Ulrike Sommer

 

Short Research Reports

Eroding Heritage: an Island Context

Sue Hamilton, Mike Seager Thomas

 

Research Updates

Heritage Research: The AHRC Heritage Priority Area

Rodney Harrison, Hana Morel, Colin Sterling, Hannah Williams

Changing lifeways in the Maloti-Drakensberg Mountains, southern Africa: Towards a history of innovation and belief in the late second millennium AD

Rachel King, David Pearce, Adelphine Bonneau, Lara Mallen

A World of Summer and Autumn: The Romano-British to Early Medieval Weald and Signs of Continuity

Andrew Margetts

Neanderthal Subsistence in Portugal: What Evidence?

Mariana Nabais

 

Research Articles

“The Petrie Museum's Collection of Funerary Wooden Models: Investigating Chronology and Provenances.”

Gersande Eschenbrenner-Diemer

The archaeology of Neolithic cooking traditions: archaeobotanical approaches to baking, boiling and fermenting

Dorian Fuller, Lara Gonzalez Carretero

‘An Awfully Nice Job’. Kathleen Kenyon as Secretary and Acting Director of the University of London Institute of Archaeology, 1935-1947.

Katie Meheux

The Institute of Archaeology Field Course at Downley Park, Singleton, West Sussex, UK. Multi period excavations around the hunting lodge of the Earls of Arundel.

Mark Roberts

Semi-fortified palatial complexes in Central Asia: new work at the Great Kyz Kala, Merv, Turkmenistan

Tim Williams, Katie Campbell, Gaygysyz Jorayev, Paul Wordsworth, Rejep Jepbarov, Sébastien Moriset

Editorial

Elizabeth Pye

News

Director's Report 2016/2017

Sue Hamilton

Obituaries

Elizabeth Pye

Studying at UCL Institute of Archaeology: Past and Present

Charlotte Frearson, Jennifer C. French

Bookshelf

Jennifer French, Marion Cutting

A Global Perspective on the Past: The Institute of Archaeology Around the World

Jennifer French, Marion Cutting

A Selection of News from the Institute

Sue Hamilton, Charlotte Frearson, Andrew Gardner

 

Research Updates

The origins of Stonehenge: on the track of the bluestones

Michael Parker Pearson, Josh Pollard, Colin Richards, Kate Welham

Artefacts of Excavation

Alice Stevenson

Developments in Ceramic Technology in North China in the Sixth Century C.E.

Shan Huang, Ian Freestone

The Building Bridges Research Project at the London Science Museum: Using An Ethnographic Approach with Under-Represented Visitor Groups

Naomi Haywood, Theano Moussouri

Archaeometallurgy in Colombia: Recent Developments

Marcos Martinon-Torres, Maria Alicia Uribe-Villegas, Juanita Saenz-Samper, Jimena Lobo Guerrero Arenas

Bones on stones

Tony Waldron

 

Short Research Reports

Supply and Demand in Prehistory? Economics of Neolithic Mining in NW Europe (NEOMINE)

Stephen Shennan, Andy Bevan, Kevan Edinborough, Tim Kerig, Mike Parker Pearson, Peter Schauer

 

Research Articles

‘A Work from an Unknown Member of the Proletariat’: Digitising and Re-examining Vere Gordon Childe’s ‘Dawn of European Civilization’.

Katie Meheux

Civilisation and Human Niche Construction

Manuel Arroyo-Kalin, Chris J. Stevens, David Wengrow, Dorian Q. Fuller, Michèle Wollstonecroft

Open for Competition: Domesticates, Parasitic Domesticoids and the Agricultural Niche

Dorian Q. Fuller, Chris J. Stevens

Human niche construction and population growth in pre-Columbian Amazonia

Manuel Arroyo-Kalin

Avoiding the pestilence of the state: some thoughts on niche construction, heritage, and sacred waterworks

David Wengrow

Editorial

Elizabeth Pye

 

News

Director's Report

Sue Hamilton

Obituaries

Elizabeth Pye

Studying at UCL Institute of Archaeology: Past and Present

Carolyn Rando, Charlotte Frearson

Bookshelf

Carolyn Rando

A Global Perspective on the Past: The Institute of Archaeology Around the World

Chiara Bonacchi, Marion Cutting

A Selection of News from the Institute

David Wengrow, Mark Altaweel, Massimiliano Pinarello

 

Research Updates

The ALBIMEH Project – Atlantic Late Bronze Age Metal Hoards Compared

X-L Armada, Marcos Martinón-Torres

Exploring ancient identities in modern Britain

Chiara Bonacchi, Richard Hingley, Thomas Yarrow

Progress in British Dendrochronology

Martin Bridge

Urbanism East of the Aral Sea: The Medieval City of Kuik-Mardan, Kazakhstan

Giles Dawkes, Gaygysyz Jorayev, Odile Rouard

Heritage Futures

Rodney Harrison, Nadia Bartolini, Caitlin DeSilvey, Cornelius Holtorf, Antony Lyons, Sharon Macdonald, Sarah May, Jennie Morgan, Sefryn Penrose

Archaeology in the Átures Rapids of the Middle Orinoco, Venezuela

Natalia Lozada Mendieta, José Oliver, Philip Riris

The Human Remains Collections at the UCL Institute of Archaeology: Recent Acquisitions from Eastgate Square, Chichester, Sussex

Carolyn Rando

 

Research Articles

Pathways of Rice Diversification across Asia

Dorian Fuller, Alison Weisskopf, Cristina Castillo

Past and Future Earth: Archaeology and Soil Studies on Ambergris Caye, Belize

Elizabeth Graham, Richard Whittet, Phillip Austin, Lindsay Duncan, Manuel Arroyo-Kalin, Julia Stegemann, Simon Turner, John Crowther, Richard Macphail, Cristina Rosique

‘All Museums Will Become Department Stores’: The Development and Implications of Retailing at Museums and Heritage Sites

Jamie Larkin

Silk Roads in the Kingdom of Bhutan and the Development of a National Heritage Inventory

Tim Williams

 

From the Collection

Rediscovery of Gertrude Caton-Thompson’s Fayum Lithic Collection

Noriyuki Shirai

Editorial

Elizabeth Pye

 

News

Director’s Report 2014-2015

Sue Hamilton

Studying at UCL Institute of Archaeology

Charlotte Frearson, Carolyn Rando

Bookshelf

C Bonacchi, C Rando

A Global Perspective on the Past: The Institute of Archaeology Around the World

Arch. Int.

The International Centre for Chinese Heritage and Archaeology (ICCHA): After a Decade of Success

Dorian Q Fuller, Rui Pang

Centre for Applied Archaeology (CAA)

Dominic Perring

Virtual Archaeology - The NextEngine Desktop Laser Scanner

Suzanna White

 

Research Updates

An Early Hunter-Gatherer Cemetery in the Canadian Lower Great Lakes

James Conolly

Whitehawk Camp Community Archaeology Project: A Report from the Archives

Hilary Orange, Andrew Maxted, Jon Sygrave, Donald Richardson

Transitional Objects: The Ucko Collection. A New Heritage Section Joint Research Project

Carmen Vida, Dean Sully

 

Research Articles

Comparing Pathways to Agriculture

Dorian Q Fuller, Eleanor Kingwell-Banham, Leilani Lucas, Charlene Murphy, Chris Stevens

The Institute of Archaeology Library 1937–1986: Collections, Communities and Networks

Katie Meheux

The Evolutionary Determinants of Health Programme: Urban Living in the 21st Century from a Human Evolutionary Perspective

Gustav Milne

Conversations about Home, Community and Identity

Theano Moussouri, Eleni Vomvyla

Discoveries from La Manche: Five Years of Early Prehistoric Research in the Channel Island of Jersey

Matt Pope, Beccy Scott, Josie Mills, Martin Bates, Richard Bates, Ed Blinkhorn, Chantal Conneller, Sarah Duffy, Marie-Anne Julien, Anne-Lyse Ravon, Andrew Shaw

 

People and Places

Alumni reflections

David Price William, Maisie Taylor, Maisie Taylor, Neil Mahrer

From the Archives: Women of the Early Institute

Elizabeth Pye

Editorial

Elizabeth Pye

 

News

Director’s Report 2013–14

Stephen Shennan

Professor David Russell Harris (1930–2013)

Ken Thomas

Studying at the UCL Institute of Archaeology

Bill Sillar, Charlotte Frearson, Lisa Daniel

Bookshelf

C Bonacchi, C Rando

A Global Perspective on the Past: The Institute of Archaeology Around the World

Arch. Int.

Awards Made from the Institute’s 75th Anniversary Fund

Andrew Reynolds

The Institute of Archaeology Conference Competition

Ruth Whitehouse

The Institute of Archaeology Research Themes

Carolyn Rando, Chiara Bonacchi

Centre for Applied Archaeology (CAA)

Dominic Perring

UCL Qatar and the Institute of Archaeology

Thilo Rehren

New Analytical Equipment Expands the Capabilities of the Institute’s Laboratories

John Merkel, James Hales

 

Research Updates

Amazonian Dark Earths in Western Amazonia?

Manuel Arroyo-Kalin

Crowd-sourced Archaeological Research: The MicroPasts Project

Chiara Bonacchi, Andrew Bevan, Daniel Pett, Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert, Rachael Sparks, Jennifer Wexler, Neil Wilkin

The Naukratis Project: Petrie, Greeks and Egyptians

Alan Johnston

Pattern in Glass Use in the Roman and Byzantine Worlds: A Report on Current Research at the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Qatar

Thilo Rehren, Ian Freestone

 

Research Articles

Scaling the State: Egypt in the Third Millennium BC

Richard Bussmann

Bats in Churches: Objective Assessment of Associated Damage Mechanisms

James Hales

The Institute of Archaeology Field Course 2014: The Search for the Lost Hunting Lodge of the Earls of Arundel at Downley, Singleton, West Sussex, UK

Mark Roberts

Microscopic Rocks and Expansive Empires: Investigating Inca Ceramics from Cuzco, Peru

Rob Ixer, Sara Lunt, Bill Sillar, Patrick Thompson

The Nobody: Exploring Archaeological Identity with George Horsfield (1882–1956)

Amara Thornton

 

People and Places

Alumni Reflections

Stuart Eve, Anna Paterlini, Jennifer Willoughby, Julie Patenaude

From the Archives

Ian Carroll, Stuart Laidlaw, Elizabeth Pye

Editorial

James Graham-Campbell

 

News

Director’s Report 2012–13

Stephen Shennan

Studying at the UCL Institute of Archaeology

Bill Sillar, Lisa Daniel, Charlotte Frearson

Bookshelf

Andrew Reynolds

A Global Perspective on the Past: The Institute of Archaeology Around the World

Arch. Int.

 

People and Places

Alumni Reflections

Nicholas Thomas, Oliver Hutchinson, Louisa Gilbert

From the Archives

Arch. Int.

 

Research Articles

‘Do larger molars and robust jaws in early hominins represent dietary adaptation?’ A New Study in Tooth Wear

Anna Clement, Simon Hillson

Researching Stonehenge: Theories Past and Present

Mike Parker Pearson

Assyrian Nimrud and the Phoenicians

Georgina Herrmann, Stuart Laidlaw

Rapa Nui (Easter Island)’s Stone Worlds

Sue Hamilton

Excavating a Silk Road City: the Medieval Citadel of Taraz, Kazakhstan

Giles Dawkes

Margaret Murray (1863–1963): Pioneer Egyptologist, Feminist and First Female Archaeology Lecturer

Ruth Whitehouse

Reflections on the 1943 ‘Conference on the Future of Archaeology’

 Gabriel Moshenska

 

Short Research Reports

The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL

 Jan Picton

UCL Qatar and the Institute of Archaeology

Thilo Rehren

Public Engagement at Archaeology South-East

Hilary Orange

Excavations of an Early Neolithic Site at Tăşnad, Romania

Ciprian Astaloș, Ulrike Sommer, Cristian Virag

Production and Consumption: Textile Economy and Urbanisation in Mediterranean Europe 1000–500 BCE (PROCON)

Margarita Gleba, Susanna Harris, Joanne Cutler

Editorial

James Graham-Campbell

 

News

Director’s Report 2011-12

Stephen Shennan

75 Years of Leading Global Archaeology: A Celebration of the Institute of Archaeology

Andrew Reynolds

Studying at the UCL Institute of Archaeology

Bill Sillar

A Global Perspective of the Past: The Institute of Archaeology Around the World

Brian Hole

Bookshelf

Andrew Reynolds

 

People and Places

From the Archives

Brian Hole

Alumni Reflections

Charles Thomas

 

Research Articles

Cultural Evolution of Neolithic Europe

Stephen Shennan

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photography: Exploring the Medieval City of Merv, on the Silk Roads of Central Asia

Tim Williams

The Origins of the Acheulean at Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania): A New Paleoanthropological Project in East Africa

Ignacio de la Torre, Lindsay McHenry, Jackson Njau, Michael Pante

The Thames Discovery Programme: Public Engagement and Research on London’s Foreshore

Nathalie Cohen, Gustav Milne, Eliott Wagg 

Swords, Settlement and Sacred Places: The Archaeology of Brisley Farm, Ashford, Kent

Jim Stevenson

 

Short Research Reports

UCL Qatar and the Institute of Archaeology

Thilo Rehren

The Centre for Applied Archaeology (CAA)

Dominic Perring

The Heritage Policy Group: Policy Development and Community Engagement at the UCL Institute of Archaeology

Joe Flatman

UCL Institute of Archaeology Research Networks

Louise Martin

Recent Investigations on Ambergris Caye, Belize

Elizabeth Graham

Aksum and the Northern Horn of Africa

David Phillipson

The Archaeology of Alchemy and Chemistry in the Early Modern World: An Afterthought

Marcos Martinón-Torres

Researching an Elizabethan Shipwreck: The Gresham Ship Project 2007-2012

Gustav Milne, Dean Sully, Jens Auer

‘Breaking Ground: 75 Years of Pioneering Archaeology’ at the Institute of Archaeology

Adam Koszary

Editorial

James Graham-Campbell

 

News

Director’s Report 2009-11

Stephen Shennan

Professor John Davies Evans 1925-2011

David Harris

The 75th Anniversary Programme

Stephen Shennan

Studying at the Institute of Archaeology

Bill Sillar

A global perspective on the past: The Institute of Archaeology around the world

Bookshelf

James Graham-Campbell

 

People and Places

Alumni Reflections

James Graham-Campbell

From the Archives

Andrew Reynolds

 

Research Articles

Çatalhöyük comes Home

Shahina Farid

The Early Rice Project: From Domestication to Global Warming

 Dorian Fuller, Alison Weisskopf

Sorotomo: A Forgotten Malian Capital?

  1. MacDonald, S. Camara, S. Canós, N. Gestrich, D. Keita

Making Weapons for the Terracotta Army

Marcos Martinón-Torres, Xiuzhen Li, Andrew Bevan, Yin Xia, Zhao Kun, Thilo Rehren

The Production of Silver in South America

Thilo Rehren

The Origins of Political Order and the Anglo-Saxon State

Stuart Brookes, Andrew Reynolds

Building Sustainability in Community Archaeology: the Hendon School Archaeology Project

Gabriel Moshenska, Sarah Dhanjal, Don Cooper

Collection and Production: The History of the Institute of Archaeology through Photography

Amara Thornton, Sara Perry

 

Short Research Reports

The UCL Institute of Archaeology and Qatar

Thilo Rehren

The Centre for Applied Archaeology (CAA)

Dominic Perring

Small Space, Big Ideas: The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Debbie Challis

Centre for Audio-Visual Study and Practice in Archaeology (CASPAR)

Don Henson

Editorial

The tenth issue of Archaeology International

Ruth Whitehouse

 

News

The Institute’s primary research groups

Ruth Whitehouse

Peter Ucko (1938–2007), Director of the Institute of Archaeology 1996–2005

Ruth Whitehouse

 

People and Places

Staff and honorary members of the Institute

Ruth Whitehouse

PhDs awarded, 2006

Ruth Whitehouse

Registered research students 2006/2007

Ruth Whitehouse

 

Research Articles

Horse kicks, flying bombs and potsherds: statistical theory contributes to archaeological survey

Clive Orton

The Knossos Urban Landscape Project: investigating the long-term dynamics of an urban landscape

Todd Whitelaw, Maria Bredaki, Adonis Vasilakis

The fragile communities of Antikythera

Andrew Bevan, James Conolly, Aris Tsaravopoulos

Diversifying the picture: indigenous responses to European arrival in Cuba

Marcos Martinón-Torres, Jago Cooper, Roberto Rojas, Thilo Rehren

Patrimony and partnership: conserving the khipu legacy of Rapaz, Peru

Renata Peters, Frank Salomon

Anti-apocalypse: the Postclassic period at Lamanai, Belize

Jim Aimers

https://doi.org/10.5334/ai.1011">Rapa Nui Landscapes of Construction

Sue Hamilton

The West Dean Archaeological Project: research and teaching in the Sussex Downs

Bill Sillar, Andrew Gardner, Ulrike Sommer, Clive Meaton

Editorial

The fifth issue of Archaeology International

David Harris

 

News

Some highlights of the 2001/2002 academic year

Peter Ucko

The Institute's Primary Research Groups in 2001-2002

David Harris

 

People and Places

Staff and Students of the Institute in 2001-2002

David Harris

 

Research Articles

Environmental archaeology at the Institute: the early years

Joan Sheldon

Archaeology and the London Thames: past, present and future

Jane Sidell

The Sedgeford project, Norfolk: an experiment in popular participation and dialectical method

Neil Faulkner

Investigating surface archaeology on the Po floodplain, northern Italy

Ruth Whitehouse

Sailors and sanctuaries of the ancient Greek world

Alan Johnston

Investigating ancient cemeteries on the island of Astypalaia, Greece

Simon Hillson

The pen behind the sword: power, literacy and the Roman army

John Wilkes

The Volubilis project, Morocco: excavation, conservation and management planning

Elizabeth Fentress, Hassan Limane, Gaetano Palumbo

Putting papyri into archaeological context: new insights from Tebtunis, Egypt

Andrew Monson, John Taie

Early Neolithic agriculture in Southwest Asia and Europe: re-examining the archaeobotanical evidence

Sue Colledge, James Conolly

The statues of 'Ain Ghazal: discovery, recovery and reconstruction

Kathryn Tubb

Environmental and cultural change in the Yiluo basin, east-central China

Arlene Rosen

Chersonesus: public archaeology on the Black Sea coast

Neal Ascherson

University museums: problems, policy and progress

Nick Merriman

Editorial

The fourth issue of Archaeology International

David Harris

 

News

Some highlights of the 2000/2001 academic year

Peter Ucko

The Institute's Primary Research Groups in 2000-2001

David Harris

 

People and Places

Staff and Students of the Institute in 2000-2001

David Harris

 

Research Articles

Remembering Frederick Zeuner and others at the Institute of Archaeology, 1945-48

Grace Simpson

The Vale of Pickering in the Mesolithic: uncovering the early post-glacial landscape

Tim Schadla-Hall

Forgotten buildings: detached kitchens in Southeast England

David Martin

Tree rings and time: recent historical studies in England

Martin Bridge

The evolutionary analysis of cultural behaviour

Stephen Shennan, Mark Collard

Wall painting in the Roman empire: colour, design and technology

Elizabeth Pye

An early entente cordiale? Cross-Channel connections in the Anglo-Saxon period

Martin Welch

Roads to riches: making good the silver ore at Lavrion in Greece

Thilo Rehren

Cattle, identity and genocide in the African Great Lakes region

Andrew Reid

Hunting, herding, feasting: animal use at Neolithic Catalhoyuk, Turkey

Louise Martin

Ashmounds and hilltop villages: the search for early agriculture in southern India

Dorian Fuller

Burials of kings or of tribal leaders? Interpreting the evidence from monumental tombs in southern Japan

Koji Mizoguchi

Collapse, conquest and Maya survival at Lamanai, Belize

Elizabeth Graham

Opening the stable door: new initiatives at the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology

Sally MacDonald, Roy McKeown, Stephen Quirke

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